Scientific Journal Covers

latest addition: &rarr& Ribosome Stamp for the Year of Chemistry 2011, Israel

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Sometimes 24hrs are enough to get a nice illustration and sometimes even after more than a month the result isn't really what I had in mind. Nevertheless, it finally became a fancy cover illustration.

Cover idea: J.M. Harms, Sean Connell and D.N. Wilson
Illustration: J.M. Harms

The image shows a 'switch' with thiopeptide antibiotic thiostrepton bound to the L7/12 stalk (upper, cyan) and micrococcin forced L12-CTD binding preparing the binding site for elongation factors like EF-G.

"Can you provide a cover image until thursday 6am?"
Less than 48hrs, but not bad at all, I think. I also liked the version with train and waggons in various colors, representing anti-shine-dalgarno sequence and some mRNA codons, in the back. But they finnally decided for the "more scientific" solution.

Cover idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

The image shows a surface model of the 30S subunit, the foot surrounded by an enlarged the SD-ASD-mRNA chain. Floating above a functional sketch.

I've been in Nara but unfortunately haven't made a foto of this special shrine. Even the japanese collaboration couldn't help. Fortunately nature corp. took over our idea.

Cover idea: J.M. Harms and D.N. Wilson

The need for an active substance against the rice blast desease lead to a bacterial strain Streptomyces kasugiensis, which was isolated from a soil sample collected at the Kasuga Shrine in Nara City, Japan. (Antibiotic: Kasugamycin)

Somehow we had the ideas of using games as a cover illustration. This "pair-game" was the best to deal with the several antibiotics from the review.

Cover idea: J.M. Harms and Frank Schlünzen
Cover illustration: J.M. Harms

The back of the cards shows a 50S subunit in surface representation. The fronts show pairwise binding site of antibiotics dalfopristin, telithromycin and the unpaired quinupristin and clindamycin.

Thursday afternoon: "We can submit a cover suggestion, would you like to produce one before you leave to grenoble on saturday (just another beamtime)." That's how to learn photoshop functions in a rush. It finally became one of a scientist (small) dreams: Once to make it onto the cover of 'nature'.

Cover idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

The image shows the tunnel view ribbon model of the 50S ribosomal subunit of Deinococcus radiodurans (which was published the same day in CELL), sorrounded by 5 flying antibiotics (Chloramphenicol, Clindamycin, Erythromycin, Clarythromycin, Roxithromycin). The first time the action of these ribosomal antibiotics could be seen in the 3d structure.

A collection of reviews on drug which affect the tranlational process. What can fit better as both subunits and the antibiotic structures.

Cover idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

Ribbon models of both ribosomola subunits, space betwen them filled with models of antibiotics: Chloramphenicol, Clindamycin, Erythromycin, Clarythromycin, Roxithromycin, Edein(30S) and Tetracyclin(30S).

A ribosome related collection of reviews. When they were asking for a cover image, I had the idea to show not only the structures of ribosomal particles, but also an overview of structure related to the process of proteinbiosynthesis. That shows a little bit about the complexibility of protein biosynthesis (meanwhile there exist many more structures).

Cover idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

Most of the available models of structures involved in the translational proces. Many of them related to authors of this issue.



Various and Book Covers

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ACA Reflexions Spring 2010 edition. Bernie asked for some images, we finally ended up doing the cover together.

Cover idea and illustration: Bernie Santarsiero and J.M. Harms

Clockwise starting with the crystals: 70S from Thermus thermophilus (Ada Yonath's groups, Berlin/Hamburg) -- early, very low resolution 70S model followed by two EM 50S-models of increasing resolution (Peter Moore) -- top left: 70S from Thermus thermophilus (V. Ramakrishnans group) -- finally an example for antibiotics bound to the ribosome (a macrolide in the tunnel).

A cover for the HASYLAB yearbook, finally it became one of the old images, reanimated.

Cover idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

The well known image of a macrolide antibiotic sitting in the tunnel of the 50S in the DESY corporate design. The background is a diffration image of a ribosome measured at DORS BW6 beamline, the relation to DESY/HASYLAB.

The cover suggestion accompanied a short article about the nobel prize in chemistry 2009. It's a structure, some funtion inhibitors and a diffraction image to show the method of Xray-crystallography.

Cover idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

The image shows an 'updated' view into the tunnel of the 50S subunit with various antibiotics positioned in the PTC (center) and at the GTPase associated region (right). The background is a diffration image of a ribosome measured at DORS BW6 beamline.

Max-Planck Directors Handbook 2005. They've chosen the image from the stock of calendar suggestions. Just had to be re-enhanced for the special need.

Original foto: C.R.
Foto preparation: J.M. Harms

Crystals of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in polarised light.

They asked for permission to use one of the first trials of 30S illustrations, I could happily deliver a better one.

Cover idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

Ribbon model of the 30S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Published in august 2003. --Dieter Holzner, Wiley-VCH.

More than 85 MPG institutes using a salary of xxMrd. Euro per year. We, as one of the small research units, were allowed to deliver the cover image for the year of bio-science (we got the structure right in time it seems). Besides, this was my first cover!

Cover idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

Ribbon model of the 30S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus.


Poster


Science at a Glance (Journal of Cell Science, invited)
Journal of cell science asked if we would like to do a poster with ribosome structure content. I thought just ribosomes structures will be not efficient and we finally made an overview of the action of various antibiotics on the translational process.

Idea and illustration: J.M. Harms -- Translation process sketch, idea: F. Schlünzen and J.M. Harms

Sketch of the translation process, arrows show the interaction from antibiotics. Ribbon models representation of the 30S and 50S subunits left an right of it. The below image blocks show an overview of antibiotic binding sites on the subunits and some example close ups.


DESY Tag der offenen Tür 2005
Hasylab user meeting 2006
Presenting our work on ribosomes on one poster wasn't easy at all, we decided to give a slight overview of the complex process of bio synthesis on the ribosom.

Illustration: J.M. Harms, Idea: J.M. Harms + F. Schlünzen

A collection of our latest functional complexes of the large ribosomal subunit. More an overview than details.

Illustration: J.M. Harms, Idea: J.M. Harms + F. Schlünzen


Max-Planck Research Units Brochure


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Recycling or 'best of' images?
To cover an overview of our recent work in the MPASMB-Brochure many images could be reused.

Illustration: J.M. Harms -- Translation process sketch, idea: F. Schlünzen and J.M. Harms

For the general introduction on ribosomal structure the overview of the translation process with the antibiotic interaction points is a good start.

For the yearbook they've chosen the more conservative image, here the shiny version found it's place.

Idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

Our first structure: 30S ribosomal subunit of Thermus thermophilus.

One of the Cell cover suggestions, rearranged for the brochure.

Idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

The way to the structure: 2D structure prediction as background, cells of Deinococcus radiodurans gave us the ribosomal particles of the large 50S subunit which experintally show up as electron density in which the structure finally was modeled (and represented as a ribbon model).

Based on another cover suggestion.

Idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

Antibiotic action of macrolides (red) by blocking the path of the nascent peptide chain in the ribosomal tunnel. Surface representation of the 50S ribosomal subunit of Deinococcus radiodurans, half cut to highlight the nascent peptide chain (green) in the tunnel. A tRNA has been docked (blue).

Based on a cover suggestion for nature structural and molecular biology.

Idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

Troleandomycin induces a flip of the L22 loop. The path of the nascent chain is blocked not only ba the antibiotic but also by the flipped loop of the protein L22.



Postacards, Stamp ....

International Year of Chemistry 2011, Ribosome - protein constructor Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2009

Day of Issue: 04/01/2011
Designer: H Kivkovich

Again, one of my early images was chosen and I produced a bunch of color variations for the stamp. The one which made it is very close to the color setting of my first image from 2001.

→ Official info text


Max-Planck-Society official postcards (2005)
After they made it to the callendar, they've choosen 2 of the images as official Max-Planck-Society postcards. (Didn't know before that it exists)


Max-Planck-Society table calendar, week content

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Max-Planck desk-calendar 2007

For this calender I could collect some images right in time. The ribosome model variations were covered last calender, therefore I put some effort in the direct preparation for the calendar.


A nice comparison to the real world always highers the chances. The first impression for me as a 'fisherman's friend' was a swarm of fish.

Original photo by: Jörg Bürger and Renate Albrecht
Pre-text and photo enhancement: J.M. Harms

Crystals of 30S subunit from Thermus thermophilus.


Grabbing like a hand.

Idea, pre-text and illustration: J.M. Harms

The trigger factor, a chaperone, welcomes the nascent chain when it's leaving the ribosomal tunnel and assists together with other chaperones the folding of the protein.


Something is growing ...

Original photo by: Dipl. Ing. Sabrina Schäfer
Pre-text and photo enhancement: J.M. Harms

The base of crystallisation, growing cells, here from fungi.


Max-Planck desk-calendar 2005

For the Max-Planck exhibition - Life Sciences alltogether more than 200 imgages were delivered from 23 Institutes. The stock from which the desk-calendar was built. We got 4 out of 6, not bad at all. From each kind of image they took one. Finally the only 30S image (again ribbons structure) was sorted out.


"Tunnel-view"

Idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

View into the tunnel of a ball-model. See more at 'eye-ware'.


One of the Cell cover suggestions, rearanged for the calendar.

Idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

The way to the structure: x-ray diffraction image as background, cells of Deinococcus radiodurans gave us the ribosomal particles of the large 50S subunit which experintally show up as electron density in which the structure finally was modeled (and represented as a ribbon model).


"Like leafs in the wind"

Original foto: C.R.
Foto preparation: J.M. Harms

Crystals of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in polarised light


"Conan the bacterium"

Original foto: Renate Albrecht
Idea and illustration: J.M. Harms

Collage of cells from Deinococcus radiodurans.


Max-Planck desk-calendar 2002
In 2000/2001 with the first 30S subunit structure published, the MPG got a lot of images from us/me. They used one for their first desk calendar.

Image made by J.M. Harms

The image shows a ribbon model of the small ribosomal subunit (30S) of thermus thermophilus. Ribosomal RNA is orange and ribosomal proteins are multi colors.


Unknown-calendar 2000
Some of our earlier results from 1999 were used for a desk calendar. I got this week page.

Image made by H. Bartels and J.M. Harms

The image shows ribosomal protein S8 of the small subunit (30S) sitting on an RNA strand. We already had density to ensure the protein is S8 but for the image it looked better without.